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MyoVision™ – the innovative spectacle lenses for myopia control

Reducing myopia progression is an important issue, particularly for children in Asia, where nearsightedness is considerably on the rise.

Myopia (nearsightedness) is a visual challenge spanning the globe, occurring across all ages and ethnicities. The root causes of myopia remain a mystery, though recent studies have demonstrated a link between the elongation of the eye and myopia progression.(2) Genetic factors do play a significant role, and Asian children are most likely affected by this visual impairment. ZEISS is introducing the innovative MyoVision™ lenses –indicating a reduction of myopia progression by an average of 30 % in East and Southeast Asian children between 6 and 12 with history of parental myopia.(1)

We usually associate myopia with getting older. In fact, nearsightedness is usually first diagnosed amongst children at the age of 4 to 6 and continues to progress until the mid-20s. Research indicates that myopia is caused by a combination of “nature” and “nurture”(3). What is even more distressing is that as many as 60% of myopic kids do have at least one myopic parent. Myopia is inevitable and irreversible and genetic defects are still a tricky matter.

Visual impairments in children on the rise

It is a known fact that myopia most likely affects Asians. Across the Asian continent, myopia is widespread – every second child living in urban populations suffers from myopia. The number of myopes globally is expected to grow from the current 1.6 billion to 2.5 billion by 2020 – an astonishing growth of more than 50 percent.

MyoVision™ – the innovative single vision lens by ZEISS

Until recently, the treatment strategies for myopia have concentrated on merely correcting vision. Latest studies have changed the understanding of myopia: correcting both central and peripheral vision is indicating to be an effective way of slowing down eye growth.(4)

A normal eye where the image is projected on the retina, both centrally and peripherally

A normal eye where the image is projected on the retina, both centrally and peripherally

A myopic eye where the image is projected in front of the retina (due to eye elongation)

A myopic eye where the image is projected in front of the retina (due to eye elongation)

And this is exactly where the new MyoVision™ spectacle lenses set in. Invented and designed in conjunction with Vision CRC, and marketed exclusively by Carl Zeiss Vision, MyoVision™ works with a simple, yet effective technique called Peripheral Vision Management technology – it corrects for sharp central vision while also moving the peripheral image in front of the retina. Its first research shows an indication that it has an effect of sending a signal to the eye to reduce progression of eye elongation.

Indicating a reduction of myopia progression by an average of 30% in East and Southeast Asian children between 6 and 12 with history of parental myopia.(1)

This state-of-the-art solution shows first promising clinical results. In the one-year-long Vision CRC Myopia Control Studies with 210 Chinese children aged 6 to 16 years with myopia, 50 children out of the 210 were given the MyoVision™ spectacle lenses and  50 children were given standard vision lenses. Amongst the Chinese population, an annual progression between 0.60D and 1.00D in young children is actually quite frequent, so it was a good place to test the new MyoVision™ spectacle lenses. The result was remarkable in a statistically significant subgroup of 19 myopic children out of the group of 50 children wearing MyoVision™ lenses, 6 to 12 years old with history of parental myopia: worn continuously, the lenses show indication of reducing  the myopia progression by an average of 30 percent in this subgroup.(1)

A corrected myopic eye with a flat-form lens. The image is projected on the retina centrally, BUT behind the retina peripherally

A corrected myopic eye with a flat-form lens. The image is projected on the retina centrally, BUT behind the retina peripherally

A corrected myopic eye with MyoVision™. The image is projected on the retina centrally, BUT in front of (or on) the retina peripherally

A corrected myopic eye with MyoVision™. The image is projected on the retina centrally, BUT in front of (or on) the retina peripherally

MyoVision™ lenses – comfortable, good-looking, and easy to handle

MyoVision™ spectacle lenses were tailor-made for the specific needs of myopic children. They not only provide kids with clear and sharp vision and indicating a reduction of myopia progression by an average of 30% in East and Southeast Asian children between 6 and 12 with history of parental myopia.(1) The lenses are also an easy-to-handle device. They are kid-friendly, thanks to their extra-thin and light lenses, guaranteeing great wearing comfort. Their neat design makes it easier for kids to adapt to them, much easier than conventional contact lenses, which are always a hassle, both for children and their parents. Visually MyoVision™ spectacle lenses are not distinguishable from common single vision lenses.

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The name ZEISS has been standing for state-of-the-art precision lenses for over 160 years. The long tradition and experience in high precision optics of the pioneer in optics assures an in-depth knowledge of the eye. It’s no surprise then that an innovation such as MyoVision™ was made possible by ZEISS.

(1) Clinical trial of 210 Chinese children between the ages of 6 and 16 years old over a period of 12 months. 50 children wearing MyoVision™ lenses, 50 children wearing standard single vision lenses and 110 children wearing other lenses. Result is achieved in a subgroup (19 children out of 50 wearing MyoVision lenses) between the ages of 6 to 12 years old and with at least one myopic parent. Sankaridurg et al, Optometry and Vision Science, Vol 87, No. 9, September 2010; pp 631-641.

(2) Wallman J, Winawer J. Homeostasis of eye growth and the question of myopia. Neuron. 2004;43:447-468.

(3) 2. Ashton GC. Segregation Analysis of Occular Refraction and Myopia. Human Heredity 1985; Vol. 35; No. 4:1415-1435 / Mutti DO, Zadnik K. The Utility of Three Predoctors if Childhood Myopia: a Bayesian Analysis. Vision Res. 1995;35:1345-1352 / Hammond CJ, Snieder H, Gilbert CE, Spector TD. Genes and Environment in Refractive Error: The Twin Eye Study. IOVS 2001;42:1232-1236

(4) Smith El III, Hung L-F. The role of optical defocus in regulating refractive development in infant monkeys, Vision Res. 1999;39;1415-1435. Zhu X, Winawer JA, Wallman J. Potency of myopic defocus in spectacle lens compensation. Invest Ophtalmol Vis Sci. 2003;44;2818-2827.

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